Last edited by Kalar
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

3 edition of The protection of movable cultural property. found in the catalog.

The protection of movable cultural property.

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Published by Unesco in Paris .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsUnesco.
The Physical Object
Pagination334p. ;
Number of Pages334
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20324009M
ISBN 109231018914

The meeting also stressed "how important it is to identify movable cultural property" and called for inventories to be compiled. The most recent major international initiative aimed at combatting the illicit trade in cultural objects is the UNIDROIT Convention on the International Return of Stolen or Illegally Exported Cultural Objects. embodied in the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict of (hereinafter "Hague "),2 which culminates a development in the international law of war that began in the mid-l9th century. Another way of thinking about cultural property is as part of a national cultural heritage.

In Prosecuting the Destruction of Cultural Property in International Criminal Law Caroline Ehlert offers an analysis of treaty law protecting cultural property from destruction and foremost of the relevant provisions for prosecuting the destruction of cultural property in international criminal law. The wanton destruction of valuable cultural property during armed conflict as well as during. Cultural Property Law Enforcement Coordinator Office of Legal and Victim Programs Executive Office for United States Attorneys I. Introduction Although, in the past, the United States Attorneys’ Bulletin has included individual articles relating to cultural property crime, this .

These international treaties endeavour to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage including ancient archaeological sites, intangible and underwater heritage, museum collections, oral traditions and other forms of heritage, and to support creativity, innovation and the emergence of dynamic cultural sectors. Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. The High Contracting Parties, Recognizing that cultural property has suffered grave damage during recent armed conflicts and that, by reason of the developments in the technique of warfare, it is in increasing danger of destruction; Being convinced that damage to cultural property belonging to any.


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The protection of movable cultural property Download PDF EPUB FB2

Protecting cultural property in armed conflict: an insight into the Second Protocol to the Hague Convention of for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict / edited by Nout van Woudenberg and Liesbeth Lijnzaad. K P   The Protection of Movable Cultural Property I: Compendium of Legislative Texts Paperback – December 1, by Unesco (Author), Hanna Saba (Editor), Nabil G.

Salame (Editor) & 0 more See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Unesco. Cultural property are physical items that are part of the cultural heritage of a group or society. They include such items as historic buildings, works of art, archaeological sites, libraries and museums.

Legal protection of cultural property comprises a number of international agreements and national laws. The Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict is the first international treaty that focuses exclusively on the protection of cultural property in armed conflict.

It was signed at The Hague, Netherlands, on 14 May and entered into force on 7 August As of Septemberit has been ratified by ive: 7 August ; 63 years ago.

Protection extends to the transportation of movable cultural property. Protection may be standard or special, depending on the importance of the property. Reprisals against cultural property are prohibited.

Cultural property must be marked with a special distinctive emblem. The Issue The Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act  (PMCH Act protects Australia's movable cultural heritage and provides for the return of foreign cultural property which has been illegally exported from its country of origin and imported into Australia.

Special protection is granted to cultural property by its entry in the 'Inter-national Register of Cultural Property under Special Protection'. This entry shall only be made, in accordance with the provisions of the present Convention and under the conditions provided for.

It covers immovable and movable cultural heritage, including monuments of architecture, art or history, archaeological sites, works of art, manuscripts, books and other objects of artistic, historical or archaeological interest, as well as scientific collections of all kinds regardless of their origin or ownership.

The Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act ensures objects that have cultural significance remain in Australia. The Act also provides for the return to the country of origin of foreign cultural property which has been illegally imported into Australia.

Detaining cultural property. When cultural property is detained upon import, the Movable Cultural Property Program: verifies if the cultural property originates from a state that is co-signatory (co-signed) to the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property.

STUDY ON THE ELABORATION OF THE OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES OF THE 2ND PROTOCOL TO THE CONVENTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF CULTURAL PROPERTY IN THE EVENT OF ARMED CONFLICT.

Journal of Architecture and Planning (Transactions of AIJ), Vol. 75, Issue. p. (a) movable or immovable property of great importance to the cultural heritage of every people, such as monuments of architecture, art or history, whether religious or secular; archaeological sites; groups of buildings which, as a whole, are of historical or artistic interest; works of art; manuscripts, books and other objects of artistic.

This is a compilation of the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act that shows the text of the law as amended and in force on 21 October (the compilation date).

The notes at the end of this compilation (the endnotes) include information about amending laws and the amendment history of provisions of the compiled law.

Add tags for "The international and national protection of movable cultural property: a comparative study". Be the first. An Act to protect Australia’s heritage of movable cultural objects, to support the protection by foreign countries of their heritage of movable cultural objects, and for related purposes.

Part I — Preliminary 1 Short title [see Note 1] This Act may be cited as the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act The Hague Convention applies to “movable or immovable property of great importance to the cultural heritage of every people” (Article 1).

However, the Convention also recommends that a limited number of locations of very great importance are placed under Special Protection. Cultural Property Law: A Practitioner's Guide to the Management, Protection, and Preservation of Heritage Resources, Second Edition By Sherry Hutt, Caroline Meredith Blanco and Stanley N Harris A growing area of practice, cultural property law crosses into many legal disciplines.

Before the commencement of the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act (“PMCH Act”) on 1 July ,3 Australia controlled the import and export of cultural material by regulations made under the Customs Act The only restrictions on import were on the import of cultural property from Papua New Guinea.4 In such cases.

Special protection is granted to cultural property by its entry in the "International Register of Cultural Property under Special Protection".

This entry shall only be made, in accordance with the provisions of the present Convention and under the conditions provided for. cultural or natural heritage. However, Africa is not a monolithic entity but a continent with regional and local diversity.

All the contributors to the book highlight that Africa’s legal heritage has been much structured by colonial powers and their actions and that the previously existing institutions of heritage protection.

Since movable cultural property is particularly exposed, during transport and temporary exhibition, to risks of damage which can arise from inept handling, faulty packaging, poor conditions during temporary storage or climatic changes, as well as inadequate reception arrangements, special measures of protection are required.InUNESCO devised an international solution to combat the illicit traffic of cultural property: the UNESCO Database of National Cultural Heritage Laws.

By compiling on the Internet the national laws of its Member States, UNESCO offers all stakeholders involved (Governments, customs officials, art dealers, organizations, lawyers, buyers and so forth) a complete and easily accessible.Cultural Property6 reflects a recognized need for every nation to join in an international cooperative effort to protect not only its own cultural heritage, but also to assist in the protection of the cultural heritage of other nations.' The UNESCO Convention was implemented in Canada in by the Cultural Property Export and Import Act.'.